The archaeology of medieval ships and harbours in northern Europe Papers based on those presented to an International Symposium on Boat and Ship Archaeology ... in 1979 (BAR international series)

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Published by British Archaeological Reports .

Written in English

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The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages260
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8306234M
ISBN 100860540685
ISBN 109780860540687

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Get this from a library. The archaeology of medieval ships and harbours in northern Europe: papers based on those presented to an International Symposium on Boat and Ship Archaeology at Bremerhaven in [Sean McGrail;]. International Ser "The Archaeology of Medieval Ships and Harbours in Northern Europe".

@The Individual Authors and The National Maritime Museum, Price £ post free throughout the world. Payments made in currency other than sterling must be calculated at the current rate of exchange and an.

The archaeology of medieval ships and harbours in Northern Europe. O.,Danish cog-finds, in S. McGrail (ed.), The archaeology of medieval ships and harbours in Northern Europe, Dhoop, T. People, Ships, Harbours & Towns.

The Impact of Maritime Trade and Commerce on Urban Structure and Social Life in 12th to 14th Century Northern Europe. During the Middle Ages in Europe, water transport was of vital importance, on inland waterways, along the coast and overseas.

Archaeological discoveries made over the last few years are providing new insights into medieval ships and shipping.

The great expansion in shipping activity during the medieval period was matched by rapid developments in technology and accompanied by the growth of 3/5(1).

Get this from a library. Medieval ships and shipping. [Gillian Hutchinson] -- During the Middle Ages in Europe, water transport was of vital importance, on inland waterways, along the coast and overseas.

Archaeological discoveries made over the last few years are providing new. Waterfront archaeology in Britain and Northern Europe: a review of current research in waterfront archaeology The archaeology of medieval ships and harbours in northern Europe book six European countries, based on the papers presented to the First International Conference on Waterfront Archaeology in North European Towns held at the Museum of London on April / edited by Gustav Milne and Brian Hobley.

Show more Show less. The ‘Friends of Newport Ship’, according to their Facebook Page, “open the Medieval Ship Centre, to visitors free of charge” every weekend. The group hopes to find a suitable location for the restored 15 th century ship by spring and is then due to open to the public.

A book based on the vessel and its history, the ‘World of the. Ancient Boats In North-West Europe: The Archaeology of Water Transport to AD Seán McGrail Sean McGrail's study received exceptional critical acclaim when it was first published in hardback only in and it is now revised and published in paperback for the first time.

Cargo ships of northern Europe adin Herteig, A. (ed.): 83 – 93 Crumun-Pedfrsen, O. Aspects of Viking-age shipbuilding, journal of Danish Archaeology 5: – offers keys to understanding several questions of Medieval ship-loading practices in the Mediterranean, including cargo loading, and where the war-horse entered his Crusader’s ship.

The Nautical Archaeology Society Key words: Medieval Mediterranean maritime history, Crusader horse transportation, stevedore, nautical archaeology, ship.

at rivers and lakes in Central Europe, France and Northern Italy from the Roman period to the yearalso integrating the recently published catalogue of Christina Wawrzinek.4 In order to integrate harbours in written sources we use an open harbour concept, which does e. also 1 Preiser-Kapeller/Daim 2 LemercierCf.

Get this from a library. The Age of Sutton Hoo: the seventh century in north-western Europe. [M O H Carver;] -- The Age of Sutton Hoo runs from the fifth to the eighth century AD - the age which separates the fall of the Roman Empire from the emergence of the.

A Maritime Archaeology of Ships: Innovation and Social Change in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe 2nd Revised ed. Edition by J. Adams (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

s: 1. Nordic ships involved in medieval trade and with construction techniques and wood technology; all are written by well-known experts in their field, A.E. Christensen, Ole Crumlin-Pedersen and CO. Cederlund. A fourth paper by Detlev EUmers explores the development and use of harbour cranes around the Baltic and North Seas during the late Middle Ages.

Waterfront archaeology in Britain and northern Europe: a review of current research in waterfront archaeology in six European countries, based on the papers presented to the First International Conference on Waterfront Archaeology in North European Towns held at the Museum of London on April / edited by Gustav Milne and Brian Hobley.

In medieval Europe, water transport was paramount, on inland waterways, along the coast and overseas. In the period covered in this comprehensive study. The Archaeology of Medieval Ships and Harbours in Northern Europe, British Archaeological Reports International Series 66 A.

Christensen Vergleichendes und etymologisches Worterbuch des. The 14th-century Merchant Ship from Sandwich: a study in medieval maritime archaeology. Archaeologia Cantiana: transactions of the Kent Archaeological Society. The archaeology of medieval ships and harbours in northern Europe (British Archaeological Reports International series 66).

Oxford: Archaeopress. Oxford: Archaeopress. Google Scholar. Litwin Jerzy. Medieval Baltic Ships - Traditions and constructional aspects. In: L'innovation technique au Moyen Âge. Actes du VIe Congrès international d'Archéologie Médiévale ( OctobreDijon - Mont Beuvray - Chenôve - Le Creusot - Montbard) Caen: Société d'Archéologie Médiévale, pp.

This book is a study of stone pilgrim imagery from the Gallo-Roman shrine to Sequanae, set in the wider context of a large number of curative cult-sites in Roman Gaul.

The Archaeology Of Medieval Ships And Harbours In Northern Europe. Author: Sean McGrail ISBN: STANFORD Genre: Archaeology, Medieval File Size: MB. The carrack was a ship type invented in southern Europe in the 15th century and particularly developed in Portugal in the same century.

It was a larger vessel than the caravel. Columbus’s ship, the Santa María was a famous example of a carrack. The ships commanded by Vasco da Gama as the São Gabriel, with six sails, a bowsprit, foresail, mizzen, spritsail and two topsails, already had the.

The use of iconographic material in medieval ship archaeology, in S. McGrail (ed.) The archaeology of medieval ships and harbours in northern Europe(British Archaeological Reports International series 66): Oxford: Archaeopress.

Google Scholar. A Maritime Archaeology of Ships: Innovation and Social Change in Medieval and Early Modern Europe Jonathan Adams n the last fifty years the investigation of maritime archaeological sites in the sea, in the coastal zone and in their interconnecting locales, has emerged as one of archaeology's most dynamic and fast developing fields.

In medieval times, the Hanseatic League met annually on a ‘Hanse Day’ in order to agree on joint action. The new Hanse has revived this tradition.” Featured Image: Construction workers were carrying out an underwater investigation when they made the unique discovery of a Medieval cog with a brick-arched oven and glazed tiles on the rear deck.

Christensen A.E. "Viking Age Rigging, A Survey of Sources and Theories" The Archaeology of Medieval Ships and Harbours in Northern Europe Cottell, G.A. "The Gokstad Viking Ship: Some New Theories Concerning the Purpose of Certain of its Constructional Features" MM 70 ()   A runic inscription found in Bergen is quite long and the author must have had a lot of “erotic energy” when he carved these runes into the 33 centimeter-long (13 inches) wooden stick: “I love that man’s wife so high that fire feels cold.

And I am that woman’s lover”. (Editor) The Archaeology of Medieval Ships and Harbours in Northern Europe: Papers Based on Those Presented to an International Symposium on Boat and Ship Archaeology at Bremerhaven inBritish Archaeological Reports (Oxford, England), COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The Ship at Kalmar, Sweden. This is the earliest excavated vessel with a stern rudder, and dates to the 13th century AD. This, and other Medieval vessels was uncovered when a small harbour that had served a castle at Kalmar was drained.

It was a small coastal vessel, only feet long and 15 feet wide. She has several interesting featuers. medieval Europe.

Our aim is to integrate these frameworks in a cross-disciplinary context. More specifically, this study examines ballast as a valuable indicator of international mobility and exchange in the harbours and port landscape of Bruges and its wider northern European context.

BALLAST AS AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL OBJECT CATEGORY. Norway and numerous harbours during the Middle Ages(Christensen,;Helleetal.,).Basedon experience in North Norway, coastal locations with the greatest potential for medieval wrecks—such as shallow-water natural harbours—are less likely to be impacted by development, which tends to focus on modern harbours for deeper-draft vessels.

Mosses have been used in Europe to caulk ship planks since the Bronze Age, and in the Medieval Period moss was the main caulking material used in both North-East Europe and Central Europe. The Archaeology of Medieval Ships and Harbours in Northern Europe Medieval Ships and Harbours in.

Northern Europe. Papers based on those presented to an. International Symposium on. Boat and Ship Archaeology at. Caves and Ritual in Medieval Europe, AD – focuses on this neglected field of research – the ritual and religious use of caves.

It draws together interdisciplinary studies by leading specialists from across Europe: from Iberia to Crimea, and from Malta to northern Norway. A cog is a type of ship that first appeared in the 10th century, and was widely used from around the 12th century on.

Cogs were clinker-built, generally of oak, which was an abundant timber in the Baltic region of vessel was fitted with a single mast and a square-rigged single sail. These vessels were mostly associated with seagoing trade in medieval Europe, especially the.

From the perspective of European archaeology, Sutton Hoo belongs to a large group of exceptionally rich burials, dating from the Neolithic period until the practice of placing lavish objects in graves ended with the adoption of Christianity, well into the medieval period in northern Europe.

As the richest early medieval burial found in Europe. Neil Christie is Professor in Medieval Archaeology at the University of Leicester. He has published a variety of sole authored and edited or co-edited volumes which have explored late antique and early medieval towns, landscape and peoples; a particular geographic focus is Italy, but he has worked also in Spain and Hungary.

Conventionally the seagoing ships of the medieval period in northern Europe have been treated as belonging to three principal traditions: the Nordic keel, the cog and the hulk (e.g.

Heinsius ; Hutchinson –20; McGrail –). Crumlin-Pedersen, O., a, Cargo ships of Northern Europe AD –, in A. Herteig (ed.), Conference on waterfront archaeology in North European towns No 2, 83– Bergen.The Disruption of the Northern Trade.

During the course of the 7 th and 8 th Centuries the maritime trade network in the northern seas expanded in response to the growing wealth of its western termini, the lands of the Franks and the Anglo-Saxons.

The era of Charlemagne and Offa of England saw Western Europe achieve a level of stability and wealth that it would not see again for several centuries.From sewn planked boats in Early Dynastic Egypt to Late Roman wrecks in Italy, and the design of Venetian Merchant Galleys, this huge volume gathers together fifty-three papers presenting new research on the archaeology and history of ancient ships and shipbuilding traditions.

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